Soomin Seo, Ph.D. (Columbia University)
Assistant Professor
Department of Journalism
soomin.seo@temple.edu

Dr. Seo’s research focuses on how journalism is evolving in a rapidly globalizing world, and how news institutions are responding to this evolution. She is currently engaged in research projects looking into media practices in East Asia and North America. Seo received her PhD in communications at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, and studied public policy at Harvard University. Her work has appeared in publications such as Journalism Studies and Columbia Journalism Review. She is also a former journalist who worked for international news outlets.  

Devon Powers, Ph.D. (New York University)
Associate Professor
Department of Advertising and Public Relations
devon.powers@temple.edu

Dr. Powers is the author of “Writing the Record: The Village Voice and the Birth of Rock Criticism,” and co-editor of “Blowing Up the Brand: Critical Perspectives on Promotional Culture.”  Her research explores historical and contemporary consumer culture and the dynamics of cultural intermediation, circulation and promotion, and has appeared most recently in Journal of Consumer Culture, New Media & Society, and Journal of Historical Research in Marketing. Her forthcoming book, “On Trends: Marketing the Cultural Future,” will be published by the University of Illinois Press in 2019.

Andrew Iliadis, Ph.D. (Purdue University)
Assistant Professor
Department of Media Studies and Production
andrew.iliadis@temple.edu

Dr. Iliadis’ work focuses on semantic technologies that support collaboration in data science. He conducts interviews with data scientists and comparative analyses of digital tools and methods for data sharing. Broadly, these projects fall under the label of critical data studies. He also studies the social impact of emerging forms of embodied computing—things like wearables, embeddables, ingestibles, and implantables.

Edward L. Fink, Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Laura H. Carnell Professor
Department of Communication and Social Influence
elf1@temple.edu

Dr. Fink researches attitude change and social influence, research methods, intercultural communication and social networks. His most recent articles deal with the effect of discrepant messages; the failure of replication of a well-known research article; the boomerang effect in attitudes; the social networks of dialysis patients; and the transmission of negative information through social networks. He has won awards for his scholarship from the National Communication Association and the International Communication Association. Dr. Fink was editor of Human Communication Research, and he is an ICA fellow and recipient of ICA’s B. Aubrey Fisher Mentorship Award. Prior to joining Temple, he was professor of communication at the University of Maryland, university distinguished scholar-teacher, and affiliate professor of sociology and of psychology. He served as chair of Maryland’s Department of Communication for 10 years and was acting associate dean for graduate studies and research. He was born in the Bronx.

Thomas L. Jacobson, Ph.D. (University of Washington)
Professor
Department of Media Studies and Production
tlj@temple.edu

Dr. Jacobson has been at Temple University since 2005, formerly working at the State University of New York at Buffalo and Northwestern University. He currently serves as director of the Master of Science in Globalization and Development Communication Program. Dr. Jacobson is chair of the Scholarly Review Committee for the International Association for Media and Communication Research. His ongoing research addresses communication and social change, democratic legitimation and communication program assessment. His most recent publications have appeared in journals including China Media Research, Annals of the International Communication Association and Journal of Communication. He also co-authored “Governance Reform Under Real World Conditions: Citizens, Stakeholders, and Voice.”

Deborah Cai, Ph.D. (Michigan State University)
Professor and Senior Associate Dean
Department of Communication and Social Influence
debcai@temple.edu

Dr. Cai’s expertise is in intercultural communication, persuasion, negotiation and conflict management. She has conducted research in China, Japan, and the United States, and she has trained political and business leaders in Afghanistan, China and developing nations from Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation. Using quantitative methods to test and model theoretical predictions, her research examines the effects of culture on social networks, relational obligations and cognitive processes related to perceptions of conflict and decision making. Dr Cai is a fellow in the International Academy of Intercultural Researchers and past-president of the International Association for Conflict Management. She served as editor of the journal, Negotiation and Conflict Management Research, and she edited a four-volume collection of research, “Intercultural Communication.” Her research has been published in outlets such as Communication Research, Human Communication Research, Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, and “The SAGE Handbook of Communication and Conflict” and :The SAGE Handbook of Persuasion.”

Carolyn Kitch, Ph.D. (Temple University)
Professor
Department of Journalism
ckitch@temple.edu

Dr. Kitch’s research and teaching areas include memory studies, media history, journalism theory, magazines, gender studies, and visual communication. In addition to more than 30 journal articles, she has published four books: “The Girl on the Magazine Cover: The Origins of Visual Stereotypes in American Mass Media”; “Pages from the Past: History and Memory in American Magazines”; “Journalism in a Culture of Grief,” co-authored with Janice Hume; and “Pennsylvania in Public Memory: Reclaiming the Industrial Past.” She also is a co-editor of the forthcoming book “Women’s Suffrage and the Media,” a collection of new historical studies scheduled for early 2020 publication by the University of Illinois Press. Dr. Kitch serves on the editorial board of 11 scholarly journals. She is a former magazine writer and editor.

Tricia S. Jones, Ph.D. (The Ohio State University)
Professor and Chair
Department of Communication and Social Influence\
tsjones@temple.edu

Dr. Jones' research in conflict and communication processes has been funded for over $3.5 million dollars with emphasis on efficacy and impact of dispute resolution processes in government systems. Her current research funding concerns evaluation of the impact of conflict coaching processes in the 62-county Community Dispute Resolution Centers in New York State. Funded by the New York Unified Court Systems, this research will provide insight into how dispute type (criminal, family, commercial, youth) and case history (previous engagement with court systems versus new case) effect the impact of conflict interventions on reduction of dispute recidivism, anxiety, escalation and increases of empathic response and collaborative behavior of disputants.

Clemencia Rodríguez, Ph.D. (Ohio University)
Professor
Department of Media Studies and Production
clemencia@temple.edu

In Dr. Rodríguez’s book, “Fissures in the Mediascape: An International Study of Citizens’ Media,” she developed her "citizens' media theory," a groundbreaking approach to understanding the role of community/alternative media in our societies. More recently she explored how people living in the shadow of armed groups use community radio, television, video, digital photography and the internet to shield their communities from the negative impacts of armed violence. This involved fieldwork in regions of Colombia where leftist guerillas, right-wing paramilitary groups, the army and drug traffickers make their presence felt in the lives of unarmed civilians. “Citizens' Media Against Armed Conflict: Disrupting Violence in Colombia” reports many of her findings. Currently her research centers on citizens’ media in post-conflict Colombia; her studies explore how communities use media and communication to overcome the negative impact the war left behind. She is also looking at the history and development of community media in Philadelphia. She teaches in the areas of media studies, communication and social change, and media in Latin America.

R. Lance Holbert, Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin)
Professor
Department of Communication and Social Influence
r.lance.holbert@temple.edu

Dr. Holbert is a persuasion scholar who studies media influence in political contexts. His most recent work deals with a wide range of political communication phenomena, from perceptions of the news media as a threat to democracy to parasocial relationships formed between citizens and politicians to the effects of social media-debate viewing multitasking on knowledge generation. He has also been devoting attention of late to improving some critical aspects of the work being undertaken by communication scientists. Topics of these works include offering greater precision when articulating a theoretical contribution to choosing a proper alpha level for null hypothesis significance testing to the positing of moderation-based relationships. He has served as chair of the National Communication Association’s (NCA) Political Communication Division, as well as of the International Communication Association’s (ICA) and NCA’s Mass Communication Division. In addition, he currently serves as editor-in-chief of Journal of Communication, the flagship journal of ICA.

Fabienne Darling-Wolf, Ph.D. (University of Iowa)
Professor
Department of Journalism
fdarling@temple.edu

Dr. Darling-Wolf’s research focuses on global media flows and processes of transnational cultural influence and their intersection with dynamics of gender, class, race and ethnicity. Combining ethnographic methods and critical textual analysis, her work has focused on the global spread and local negotiation of such diverse texts as Japanese magazines, French rap, international news, photojournalism, Japanese pop idols, and reality television. Her book “Imagining the Global: Transnational Media and Popular Culture Beyond East and West” was awarded the International Communication Association’s Outstanding Book Award in 2016. In her most recent book, the “Routledge Handbook of Japanese Media” — an edited collection of the works of 25 globally celebrated scholars — she reflects on the long history of Japanese global cultural influence and its continuing contemporary power.

Wazhmah Osman, Ph.D. (New York University)
Assistant Professor
Department of Media Studies and Production
wazhmah.osman@temple.edu

In addition to her work at Klein College, Dr. Osman is a faculty affiliate of the Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies Program and the South Asia Center at University of Pennsylvania. She is currently writing a book that analyzes the impact of international funding and cross-border media flows on the national politics of Afghanistan, the region and beyond. Dr. Osman is also researching how new technologies of war, violence and representation, predicated on old colonial tropes, are being repackaged and deployed during “the war on terror.” Her critically acclaimed documentary, “Postcards from Tora Bora,” has been shown in festivals around the world. Her research and teaching are rooted in feminist media ethnographies that focus on the political economy of global media industries and the regimes of representation and visual culture they produce.

Brian Creech, Ph.D. (University of Georgia)
Assistant Professor
Department of journalism
brian.creech@temple.edu

Dr. Creech publishes broadly in the critical study and analysis of journalism, focusing primarily on technology and journalism’s representational authority in the public sphere. Over the past year, articles dealing with journalism about the white working class in the 2016 election, the prevalence of innovation advocacy and market fundamentalism around journalism think tanks and funders, and lessons on “fake news” from the 19th century have been published in journals including: Journalism: Theory, Practice, and Criticism; Journalism Practice; and the European Journal of Cultural Studies. His current project, starting from recent panics around “fake news,” considers emerging discourses around the logistical and cultural power Silicon Valley now wields over the public sphere, theorizing the normative and political economic consequences for American media and democracy, as well as identifying opportunities for articulating visions of the public sphere that are not reliant on the market fundamentalism embodied by technology and social media companies.

Patrick D. Murphy, Ph.D. (Ohio University)
Associate Professor and Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies
Department of Media Studies
murphy.p@temple.edu

Dr. Murphy is the former chair of the Department of Media Studies and Production in Klein College and former chair of the Department of Mass Communications at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. His research interests include global media, media and the environment, documentary media, ethnographic method, and Latin American media and cultural theory. Dr. Murphy is author of “The Media Commons: Globalization and Environmental Discourses,” and is co-editor of “Negotiating Democracy: Media Transformation in Emerging Democracies” and “Global Media Studies,” and his work has appeared in Environmental Communication; Communication, Culture and Critique; Global Media and Communication; Communication Theory; Popular Communication; Cultural Studies; Journal of International Communication; and Qualitative Inquiry, as well as chapters in many edited books. He has also translated into English articles by some of Latin America’s most prominent communication scholars. Currently he is working on a book about media activism and environmental transition discourses.

Logan Molyneux, Ph.D. (University of Texas at Austin)
Assistant Professor
Department of Journalism
logan@temple.edu

Dr. Molyneux is a former journalist turned researcher who studies what journalists do. His research focuses on journalistic practice, especially relating to mobile and social media. He also studies changing habits of news consumption and the ways in which emerging media technologies shape communication and public life. His recent work includes studies of learning from mobile news, how journalists use social media in political coverage and personal branding among journalists.

Jennifer Ball, Ph.D. (University of Texas at Austin)
Assistant Professor
Department of Advertising and PR
jennifer.gerard.ball@temple.edu

Dr. Ball’s research interests involve a psychological perspective on communication with a specific focus on trust, the interplay of emotion and cognition, and information processing as applied to advertising and promotional health communication. To date, she has implemented these interests through a steady stream of research investigating the effects and perceptions of direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertisements from a variety of perspectives. She has published her work in both health communication and marketing communication journals including the International Journal of Advertising, Journal of Health Communication, Journal of Current Issues and Research in Advertising, Journal of Consumer Affairs, and Health Marketing Quarterly. Dr. Ball’s current research agenda continues to examine responses to strategic health messages as a relevant context in which to develop a deeper understanding of the role of narrative processing in assessing health risks and benefits.

Lauren Kogen, Ph.D. (University of Pennsylvania)
Assistant Professor
Department of Media Studies and Production
lauren.kogen@temple.edu

Dr. Kogen’s research focuses on two sub-fields of communication research: communication for development and social change (CSC) — specifically, how to use communication to improve the lives of marginalized groups — and communication about development — specifically, how development issues are framed for U.S. audiences. Dr. Kogen has also conducted numerous evaluations of CSC projects in the U.S. and around the world. Her scholarly work has appeared in academic journals including the International Communication Gazette, Mass Communication and Society, and Media, Culture, and Society.

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